Reports and Stories of the Forgotten Australians throughout the 19th and 20th centuries.
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Ex PM Kevin Rudd apologises to the Forgotten Australians and Child Migrants Nov 16 2009

"...They should be honoured for their experience and given every support they need in order to participate fully in the community of which they are part..."

Speech Senator Gary Humphries on the Forgotten Australians Inquiry.

Volume 1


This volume is the introduction to the Final Report of the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse. The report represents the culmination of our five-year inquiry into institutional responses to child sexual abuse and related matters.

It presents the findings and recommendations of the Royal Commission. It also documents the experiences of peopleaffected by child sexual abuse in an institutional context.

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Volume 2


The Letters Patent provided to the Royal Commission required that it ‘inquire into institutional responses to allegations and incidents of child sexual abuse and related matters’. In carrying out this task, the Royal Commission was directed to focus on systemic issues, be informed by an understanding of individual cases, and make findings and recommendations to better protect children…

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LEARN MORE ABOUT THE FA's

INQUIRIES

It is not just the impact that tragic childhood experiences have had for the Forgotten Australians. Their children and families have also felt the impact, which can then flow through to future generations.
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This image dedicated to all those abused whilst under Institutional care.
This image dedicated to all those abused whilst under Institutional care.
It is not just the impact that tragic childhood experiences have had for the Forgotten Australians. Their children and families have also felt the impact, which can then flow through to future generations.
This volume is the introduction to the Final Report of the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse. The report represents the culmination of our five-year inquiry into institutional responses to child sexual abuse and related matters.
The Letters Patent provided to the Royal Commission required that it ‘inquire into institutional responses to allegations and incidents of child sexual abuse

Volume 3


This volume describes what we learned during our inquiry about the impacts of child sexual abuse and the impacts of institutional responses to that abuse on victims and their families, as well as on other people in the institution, community and wider society.

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Volume 4


This volume describes what we have learned about survivors’ experiences of disclosing child

sexual abuse. The experiences of survivors, told to us in private sessions and written accounts,

have informed our understanding of the factors that prevent or assist disclosure

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This volume describes what we learned during our inquiry about the impacts of child sexual abuse and the impacts of institutional responses to that abuse on victims and their families,
This volume describes what we have learned about survivors’ experiences of disclosing child
sexual abuse. The experiences of survivors, told to us in private sessions and written accounts,
have informed our understanding of the factors that prevent or assist disclosure

Volume 5


Between May 2013 and May 2017, 6,875 people came forward and told their stories of sexual abuse in an institution to one or more Commissioners during a private session. We expect to have held approximately 8,000 private sessions at the completion of the inquiry.

Information from private sessions was captured in a number of ways, including:

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Volume 6

This volume examines the reporting of child sexual abuse to external government authorities by institutions and their staff and volunteers, and how institutions have responded to complaints of child sexual abuse.and the way that regulatory oversight and practice should be

improved to facilitate the implementation of the Child Safe Standards in institutions.


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Between May 2013 and May 2017, 6,875 people came forward and told their stories of sexual abuse in an institution to one or more Commissioners during a private session. We
This volume examines the reporting of child sexual abuse to external government authorities by institutions and their staff and volunteers, and how institutions have responded to complaints of child sexual abuse.

Volume 7

This volume examines the reporting of child sexual abuse to external government authorities by institutions and their staff and volunteers, and how institutions have responded to complaints of child sexual abuse. It outlines guidance for how institutions should handle complaints, and the need for independent oversight of complaint handling by certain institutions.

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Volume 8


This volume looks, first, at records and recordkeeping by institutions that care for or provide

services to children. The creation of accurate records and the exercise of good recordkeeping

practices are critical to identifying, preventing and responding to child sexual abuse. Records

are also important in alleviating the impact of child sexual abuse for survivors. We make

recommendations to improve records and recordkeeping practices within institutions.


read here

This volume examines the reporting of child sexual abuse to external government authorities by institutions and their staff and volunteers, and how institutions have responded to complaints of child sexual abuse.
This volume looks, first, at records and recordkeeping by institutions that care for or provide
services to children. The creation of accurate records and the exercise of good recordkeeping
sexual abuse. The experiences of survivors, told to us in private sessions and written accounts,
have informed our understanding of the factors that prevent or assist disclosure

OUR INQUIRY

Understanding child sexual abuse in institutional contexts

CHILD SAFE INSTITUTIONS

Volume 9


This volume examines the advocacy and support and therapeutic treatment service needs of victims and survivors of child sexual abuse in institutions and makes recommendations

for how best to meet these needs. Through public hearings, private sessions, research and

consultation processes, we have gained an understanding of the diverse needs of children and adults who experienced childhood sexual abuse in institutions and the strengths and

weaknesses of service systems in responding to those needs.


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Volume 10

In the course of our inquiry we learned that the sexual abuse of children by adults does not represent all child sexual abuse that occurs within institutions. Children have also been sexually abused by other children. In this volume, we examine child sexual abuse in institutions by children with harmful sexual behaviours. We look at the nature and extent of the problem, how institutions and governments currently address it, and what can be done to improve responses to children with harmful sexual behaviours, particularly therapeutic interventions.


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This volume examines the advocacy and support and therapeutic treatment service needs of victims and survivors of child sexual abuse in institutions and makes recommendations
for how best to meet these needs. Through public hearings, private sessions, research and
In the course of our inquiry we learned that the sexual abuse of children by adults does not represent all child sexual abuse that occurs within institutions. Children have also been sexually abused by other children. In this volume, we examine child sexual abuse in

Volume 11

Between the 1800s and 1990, hundreds of thousands of children across Australia were placed in residential institutions such as orphanages, children’s homes, reception centres, hostels, hospitals, and missions, reserves and related institutions.1 Many hundreds of residential institutions operated in Australia from post–World War II until the 1990s; however, the exact number has been difficult to determine.2 Find & Connect, the Australian Government web resource of historical resources

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Volume 12

This volume examines what we learned during our inquiry about institutional responses to

child sexual abuse in contemporary (post-1990) out-of-home care. It examines the factors that continue to contribute to child sexual abuse in particular out-of-home care settings, the risks to children associated with different forms of care and some of the barriers for children in identifying and disclosing sexual abuse. While our preceding volume –


read here

Between the 1800s and 1990, hundreds of thousands of children across Australia were placed in residential institutions such as orphanages, children’s homes, reception centres, hostels, hospitals, and missions, reserves and related institutions.
This volume examines what we learned during our inquiry about institutional responses to
child sexual abuse in contemporary (post-1990) out-of-home care. It examines the factors that continue to contribute to child sexual abuse in particular out-of-home care settings,services to children. The creation of accurate records and the exercise of good recordkeeping
sexual abuse. The experiences of survivors, told to us in private sessions and written accounts,
have informed our understanding of the factors that prevent or assist disclosure

SUPPORT AND TREATMENT

PARTICULAR INSTITUTIONS

Volume 13


This volume examines what we learned about institutional responses to child sexual abuse in

government and non-government (Catholic or Independent) primary and secondary schools.

It examines the nature and adequacy of institutional responses and draws out the contributing factors to child sexual abuse in schools.

It makes recommendations to prevent child sexual abuse from occurring in schools and, where it does occur, to help ensure effective responses to that abuse.


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Volume 14

This volume examines what we learned about institutional responses to child sexual abuse in sport and recreation institutions. It describes children’s sport and recreation in Australia, child sexual abuse in this context, and the nature and adequacy of institutional responses to that abuse. This volume makes recommendations to prevent child sexual abuse from occurring in sport and recreation environments and, if it does occur, to help ensure effective responses.


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This volume examines what we learned about institutional responses to child sexual abuse in
government and non-government (Catholic or Independent) primary and secondary schools.
It examines the nature and adequacy of institutional responses and draws out the contributing factors to child sexual abuse in schools.for how best to meet these needs. Through public hearings, private sessions, research and
This volume examines what we learned about institutional responses to child sexual abuse in sport and recreation institutions. It describes children’s sport and recreation in Australia, child sexual abuse in this context, and the nature and adequacy of institutional responses to that abuse.

Volume 15

This volume describes what we learned during our inquiry about the risk of child sexual abuse in detention environments since 1990, as well as the responses of governments and institutions to the abuse.

It focuses on youth detention and immigration detention, as examples of contemporary detention environments where a significant number of children have been, and in some cases continue to be, detained by Australian governments,

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Volume 16


This volume examines what we learned during our inquiry about institutional responses to

child sexual abuse in contemporary (post-1990) out-of-home care. It examines the factors that continue to contribute to child sexual abuse in particular out-of-home care settings, the risks to children associated with different forms of care and some of the barriers for children in identifying and disclosing sexual abuse. While our preceding volume –


read here Vol 1. Vol 2. Vol 3

This volume describes what we learned during our inquiry about the risk of child sexual abuse in detention environments since 1990, as well as the responses of governments and institutions to the abuse.
This volume examines what we learned during our inquiry about institutional responses to
child sexual abuse in contemporary (post-1990) out-of-home care. It examines the factors that continue to contribute to child sexual abuse in particular out-of-home care settings,services to children. The creation of accurate records and the exercise of good recordkeeping
sexual abuse. The experiences of survivors, told to us in private sessions and written accounts,
have informed our understanding of the factors that prevent or assist disclosure

Volume 17

The key recommendations of our Working With Children Checks report included: that state

and territory governments amend their Working With Children Checks laws to implement

the standards identified in the report, and to enable Working With Children Check clearances from other jurisdictions to be recognised and accepted; and that the Australian Government facilitate a national model for Working With Children Checks, including by establishing a centralised database.

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Between the 1800s and 1990, hundreds of thousands of children across Australia were placed in residential institutions such as orphanages, children’s homes, reception centres, hostels, hospitals, and missions, reserves and related institutions.

Recommendations

The Australian Government should conduct and publish a nationally representative

prevalence study on a regular basis to establish the extent of child maltreatment in

institutional and non-institutional contexts in Australia.


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The Australian Government should conduct and publish a nationally representative
prevalence study on a regular basis to establish the extent of child maltreatment in
institutional and non-institutional contexts in Australia.child sexual abuse in contemporary (post-1990) out-of-home care. It examines the factors that continue to contribute to child sexual abuse in particular out-of-home care settings,services to children. The creation of accurate records and the exercise of good recordkeeping
sexual abuse. The experiences of survivors, told to us in private sessions and written accounts,
have informed our understanding of the factors that prevent or assist disclosure

Royal Commission's Final Report

Another place for the Forgotten Australians
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